Testimonials

Nigerian Red Cross

“This project breathes life into first aid practice and provides a big push for the development of first aid manuals in Africa.”

 
Benson Agbro, Nigerian Red Cross, member of the AFAM expert panel
     

South African Cochrane Centre

“This Red Cross group sets the trend for evidence-based guidelines in first aid.”

 
Jimmy Volmink, South African Cochrane Centre, Chair of the AFAM expert panel
     

American International Health Alliance

The AFAM preventive messages are based on availabe research evidence and will form a significant contribution to preventive efforts in Africa.”

 
Omar Ahmed, American International Health Alliance, 
Ethiopia
     

AFAM in Swaziland

Swaziland is a small country in southern Africa with its own Red Cross society. Until 2010, the country's First Aid instructors each used their own teaching material: one used the manual of the South African Red Cross, another that of the Danish Red Cross and so on.

 
Nosy Dlamini, first aid coordinator for the Baphalali Swaziland Red Cross Society

Modern methods

Instructors would typically stand up in front of their group and start to tell them about first aid. This is an outdated talk-and-listen method of teaching. This method was often in stark contrast to the modern facilities in the companies by which they had been invited to teach. Such the sessions had limited impact on participants.

Easy to understand

Thanks to AFAM, this situation has changed. "We're delighted that Swaziland was chosen for the AFAM pilot project", says Nosy Dlamini, First Aid coordinator for the Baphalali Swaziland Red Cross. "The AFAM guidelines are easy to understand and to follow."

Uniform standards

Nosy Dlamini: "We have used them to teach our first aid instructors uniform standards and procedures which they now all teach in their lessons. A set program has been compiled for examinations and our instructors all use the same PowerPoint presentations and accompanying handouts. We're pleased that during the pilot project we have been able to translate this teaching material into Swazi, the country's other official language alongside English."

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